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Put those damn phones down

Thanks to the Georgia legislature, we are all soon to be at liberty to listen to rock and roll, ride with the windows down and enjoy the sights from our cars on warm summer evenings. (Boy that is a compliment you never think of giving a government body).

But come July 1, we can all turn up that Skynyrd, crank up the Big K.R.I.T and listen without being disturbed while you cruise home from work. Or you may be the type to take that special someone on a moonlight drive and want to talk to them, as opposed to someone on a cell – “Oh, I just got to take this one.”

And you may be surprised what has changed in Pickens County since the last time you went for spin – one where you  checked out the scenery, rather than social media. 

What we’re talking about is the state’s Hands Free Georgia law going into effect at the end of this month requiring you “keep your eyes on the road and your hands upon that wheel” - [as Roadhouse Blues advises drivers].

When those powerful, stylish, gas-guzzling machines of the mid 1900s to the 1970s rolled out of a driveway, you didn’t call, didn’t sit with eyes glued to a little screen while the real world slid past. You cruised and you sure as heck didn’t spend the whole drive yakking on a little phone with your spouse about plans for the front yard.

Back when America was inhabited by real people, not a herd of social media sheep, winding out on the highway, you sat back and thought about life or at least what you were going to do when you got home. Reflective-time, as close as many of us get to being philosophical and something that can’t be done while fielding calls from customers, bosses or co-workers about a project that really can wait until you get to  work. 

Work is where work happens, cars are where driving happens.

The fact that the state had to pass a law that makes it’s illegal to fiddle around with some computer-toy-phone while driving shows how much we’ve all been sucked into the online world. It’s unbelieveable that our Georgia highway rules have to state that it is illegal to watch a video and drive a car at the same time.

“It’s become a habit we don’t think twice about since we have been talking on our phones while driving for more than three decades and it is going to take time for all of us to stop automatically reaching for the phone when it rings,” GOHS Communication Director Robert Hydrick said in a press release last week.  “If you want to talk on your phone or use GPS while driving, now is the time to implement those measures so hands-free will become the instinctive thing to do.”

Better yet, don’t implement those things. Don’t do anything to compel you to keep on squawking while driving. In fact, tell people you want to make it illegal to talk on a cell phone in a restaurant or while waiting in line at the grocery store.

We encourage all our readers to use that time in the car to take a break from the constant contact that cell phones force upon. Studies have shown that people develop automatic reactions when they hear that little ping indicating a new alert -- like Pavlov’s dogs starting to slobber at a sound. Give yourself a break; studies are also finding that more social media/digital communication may produce depression and anxiety.

While the state passed this law for sorely needed improvement with highway safety, we hope it has some beneficial social effects with people regaining a sense of reflectiveness and sanity that follows them, even when they aren’t behind the wheel.