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No way new courthouse doesn’t meet needs -- just look at it

    There is a video on Youtube that is entertaining in a headshaking way – it’s a collection of traffic clips that show what happens when different size rental/delivery trucks drive through underpasses that are too low.
    In most cases the clips show a clearly marked sign indicating the bridge or tunnel height before showing the roofs getting ripped off.
    From the video (click here to view) it doesn’t appear that anyone is injured, but a great deal of automotive carnage is shown because drivers either didn’t notice the signage of the low underpass or simply couldn’t do the math --12-foot-high truck plus 11.5-foot-high concrete bridge equals one big mess.
    This video came to mind last week when reading in the Grand Jury Presentment saying how the almost ready to officially open courthouse (with a price expected somewhere around $13 million) is judged too small for future growth. According to the grand jury presentments, “Another concern of the department heads is the potential impact of future growth that may require expanded services and personnel with the accompanying need for additional work areas. Most departments are now at a maximum capacity with very little accommodation for expansion if needed.”
    Seeing that statement brought the same feeling the owners of those trucks must have felt if they saw the video of their vehicle having its top sheered off -- a sickening, “you have got to be kidding me” reaction.
    The parking was also judged utterly frustrating and unacceptable in the Grand Jury Presentments, but most everyone has offered that opinion since the project began. To borrow a phrase Sole Commissioner Rob Jones favors, the parking “is what it is.”
    There are only two possible explanations for why this courthouse could possibly be judged too cramped (1.) It was truly built too small or (2.) Some judicial  employees didn’t get everything they wanted and are grousing.
    We know that not all department heads felt this way. At least one said the building space was more than adequate for future growth and overall the building has plenty of empty areas, which could be reconfigured if some department area needs more room.
    Another reason we’ll argue that the building is more than adequate: Look at it. That mammoth structure dominating Main Street is impressive; it’s grand; there is nothing cramped, small or limited about it. Maybe a few offices/courtrooms inside are smaller than preferred, but the idea that overall it’s not big enough to meet future needs can’t be right.
    Jasper Mayor John Weaver (who spent a considerable amount of time there for a recent civil suit) made an off-hand comment that the view and space in the second-floor bathroom was better than his office. Weaver, who normally butts heads on all things county, confided to our editor that he was quite impressed with the facility after a weeklong case there.
    Furthermore, we’d point out the idea that everything has to be built supersize is outdated. A predicted growth wave through the late 80s and 90s was tossed out to justify anything government or school administrators wanted at the time. No longer is that the case. It might be the case again some day, but there is no reason to believe that north Georgia will see a massive population spike anytime soon.
    One other simple comparison: The new courthouse is much, much bigger than the old leaky courthouse and, despite squalid conditions there, the courts did function. If they could work there, they surely can work in the new modern facility.
    Perhaps these department heads who feel hemmed in should randomly call 10 business owners and see how much facility expansion they have written checks for in the past decade. When the owners are the ones writing checks make-do, not re-do, is the answer.
    The new courthouse is nearly complete, it looks very nice and it’s been brought in apparently on-budget and more or less on-time. We say nice job Commissioner Jones and crew.   
    Case closed.